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About ACI-NA
Airports Council International-North America
is the "Voice of Airports" representing local, regional and state governing bodies that own and operate commercial airports in the United States and Canada. ACI-NA member airports enplane more than 95 percent of the domestic and virtually all the international airline passenger and cargo traffic in North America. ACI-NA Associate members represent a wide variety of businesses that provide products and services to the aviation and airport industry.

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Jobs & RFPs
Don't forget the ACI-NA Web site when you are trying to fill a staff position. As a member benefit, airports and associate members can post free job announcements. In addition, member airports can post their RFPs and other contract solicitations on the ACI-NA Web site.

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ACI-NA 2010
Board of Directors
Executive Committee

Frank R. Miller
Chairman
Aviation Director
San Antonio Aviation Department
San Antonio

 

Thella Bowens
First Vice Chair
President/CEO
San Diego County
Regional Airport Authority
San Diego

 

Thomas J. Kinton, Jr.
Second Vice Chair
CEO & Executive Director
Massachusetts
Port Authority
Boston

 

David. N. Edwards, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer
Executive Director
Greenville-Spartanburg
International Airport
Greer, S.C. 

 

G. Hardy Acree
Immediate Past Chairman
Director of Airports
Sacramento County Airport System
Sacramento

 

William Restall
President & CEO
Saskatoon Airport
Authority
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

 

ACI-NA President
Greg Principato

 

Directors
Iftikar Ahmad

Director of Aviation
New Orleans
Aviation Board
New Orleans

Kim Day
Manager of Aviation
Denver Department
of Aviation
Denver

Laddie E. Irion
Vice President/Director,
Air Transportation
URS
Tampa

Bernard Leblanc
President/CEO
Saint John
Airport Authority
St. John, N.B.

Bradley S. Livingston
Airport Director
Dane County
Regional Airport
Madison, Wis.

John Martin
Airport Director
San Francisco Airport Commission
San Francisco

Lloyd McCoomb
President/CEO
Greater Toronto
Airports Authority

Toronto

Richard McConnell
Airport Director
Boise Airport
Boise

John Mok
CEO
Kenton County Airport Board
Cincinnati

Brad Penrod
Executive Director/CEO
Allegheny County
Airport Authority
Pittsburgh

Raul Regalado
President & CEO
Metropolitan Nashville
Airport Authority
Nashville

Maureen Riley
Executive Director
Salt Lake City
Department of Airports
Salt Lake City

Tom Ruth
President & CEO
Halifax International Airport
Authority
Halifax, Nova Scotia

Susan M. Stevens
Director of Airports
Charleston International Airport
Charleston, S.C.

Elsie Rast-Stuart
Commissioner
Columbia Metropolitan
Airport
Columbia, S.C.

Jim Trout
Commissioner
Glacier Park International Airport
Kalispell, Mont.

William Vanecek
Director of Aviation
Buffalo Niagara
International Airport
Buffalo

Russ Widmar
Director of Aviation
City of Fresno
Fresno, Calif.

2010 World Business
Partners/ Associates
Board of Directors
 

Executive Committee

Steven T. Baldwin
Chair
Senior Vice President
The Louis Berger Group
Albany

  

Kitty P. Freidheim
Vice Chair
President
Freidheim Consulting
Chicago

 

Laddie E. Irion
Immediate Past Chair
Vice President/Director, Air Transportation
URS
Tampa

 

G. Hardy Acree
ACI-NA Board Liaison
Director of Airports
Sacramento County Airport System
Sacramento

 

Directors 

Roddy L. Boggus
Senior Vice President/Aviation Market Leader
Parsons Brinckerhoff (PB)
Dallas

 

Paul Bowers
Publisher
Airport Improvement Magazine
Brookfield, Wis.

 

Armen DerHohannesian
General Manager
Armen DerHohannesian & Associates
Hampton, N.H.

 

Kevin Dolliole
Senior Vice President
Unison Consulting
Chicago

 

Bruce Feuer
Vice President, Business Development
The Paradies Shops
Atlanta

 

Evan C. Futterman
President and CEO
Futterman Consulting
Springfield, Va.

 

Kurt Krummenacker
Assistant Vice President/Analyst
Moody's Investors Service
New York

 

Lynn Leibowitz
President
Leibowitz & Horton Airport Management Consultants
Greenwood Village, Colo.

 

Keith Thompson
Principal
Gensler
Newport Beach, Calif.

 

Loy Warren
National Aviation Leader
Kimley-Horn & Associates
Irving, Texas

 
     
     
 
View past issues in the @irports update archive
 
 
 
 
 
Top Stories
 4.20.2011
 
     
     
   
 
Hot Topics
ACI-NA Applauds DOT for Enhancing Air Travelers' Rights

ACI-NA today commended Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood for issuing new regulations that better protect air travelers.  Airports have long advocated that airlines be required to provide passengers with more and better information on which to base travel decisions.  ACI-NA had also urged DOT to issue regulations protecting passengers on international flights and those traveling through smaller airports.

ACI-NA Applauds DHS on the National Terrorism Advisory System

Today, the Department of Homeland Security announced its replacement of the color-coded threat advisory system with the National Terrorism Advisory System, a robust terrorism advisory system that provides timely information to the public about credible terrorist threats.

FAA Considers Incentive Plan Proposed by Las Vegas

As a result of a request by Las Vegas McCarran International Airport to create an air service development incentive program designed to encourage airlines to use larger planes, the FAA on Friday decided to seek comments on the concept before acting on the airport’s petition.

Airports Urged to Act to Get Industry Priorities into FAA Bill

This week, ACI-NA’s President Greg Principato sent letters to the leadership of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee outlining airport priorities as the two chambers begin their work ironing out the differences in their two versions of the FAA reauthorization bill. 

Putting the Brakes on a Flawed Bill

ACI-NA successfully delayed action on a proposed House-credentialing bill that would have forced airports to allow individuals who are denied a SIDA badge to use the Transportation Worker Identification Credential waiver and appeals process through TSA.

Airport Best Practices Forum Takes Off

The Strategic Planning and Performance Management Working Group of the ACI-NA Finance Committee held the first of a series of Best Practices Forum webinars on “Strategic Planning” on April 12. It was well attended with 28 airport and associate members.

Talks Continue in the Rate Litigation at LAX

While one airline has settled its rent dispute with Los Angeles International Airport, the six other carriers continue to negotiate a settlement.

A Confused Situation within the EU is Emerging

Next Friday, April 29, there may be a new set of rules governing travel into and between European Union members. Some, but not all, of the EU members have adopted a regulation suggested by the European Commission which relaxes some of the rules concerning carry-on liquids, aerosol and gels.

Events On Approach

New Airport Economic and Human Capital Conference
& Business Information Technology Conference Agendas

Airport Economic and Human Capital Conference will be co-located with the Human Resources and Business Information Technology Conferences in Phoenix on May 2-4. This is to better leverage the strengths of each group to achieve increased organizational success at tackling today’s, and preparing for tomorrow’s, challenges. Each conference will have their own track to make the conference experience unique and beneficial for all attendees. Below is each committee’s agenda.

Air Cargo Conference: Roundtable with Federal Partners
The 2011 Air Cargo Conference will be June 1-2 in Arlington, Va., at the Hyatt Arlington. General Sessions 4: Roundtable with Federal Partners takes a look at security from the perspective of the airport, the airlines, and freight forwarders. There will not be any slide presentations at this session, just good old-fashioned discussion and debate, and the opportunity for those in the audience to get their questions answered. Doug Britten, head of cargo security, Transportation Security Administration; Todd Owen, executive director, cargo screening programs, U.S. Customs and Border Protection; Shari Currie, director air cargo security, Transport Canada; will be on the panel. To learn more about this session click here.

May 5 is the Early Bird deadline for the discounted registration rate and the last day to obtain the special group rate of $189 at Hyatt Arlington. Call (703) 525-1234 to reserve your room.

"Undercover Boss" to Open Marketing and Communications/Jumpstart® Program
Bryan Bedford, the airline executive who created an industry game-changer when his Republic Airways purchased Frontier Airlines and Midwest Express, will be the keynote speaker on June 21 at the ACI-NA Marketing and Communications Conference  in Cleveland, June 20-23 at the Renaissance Cleveland. Bedford last fall appeared in an episode of CBS’s Undercover Boss. At JumpStart, airport marketers will meet one-on-one with airline decision-makers to make the case for new air service. April 29 is the deadline for airports to sign up for their “wish list.”

May 19 is the Early Bird deadline for the discounted registration rate and the last day to obtain the special group rate of $149 at Renaissance Cleveland. Call (216) 696-5600 to reserve your room.

See upcoming ACI-NA Events

Committee Update

The ACI-NA Facilitation Committee addresses issues related to the facilitation of international travel and trade through improvements of government and industry approaches to international cargo and passengers.  Byford Treanor, III, DFW, serves as chair and Ron Lewis, Orlando, serves as vice chair of the Facilitation Committee.      

ACI-NA staff have submitted comments and met with U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Department of Homeland Security officials on a variety of occasions to discuss the staffing and facility issues, seamless travel initiative, model ports program, cargo requirements, and user fee airport concerns.

Most recently, ACI-NA submitted comments on burdensome CBP regulations as part of its broader filing on DHS regulations.  It recommended CBP make the Global Entry Program permanent to expand it to additional airports; eliminate the National Security Entry and Exit Registration System process; eliminate the I-94 and General Customs Declaration forms, and examine ways to revive a secure air transit program.  ACI-NA urged CBP to be flexible in applying its Airport Technical Design Standards and its memoranda with user fee airports.

ACI-NA met with the Department of States’ Bureau of Consular Affairs about U.S. airport concerns that the visa process discourages travel to the United States. It signed a travel industry letter to President Obama urging discussions with Brazil and Chile on a roadmap to joining the Visa Waiver Program so their citizens would not require U.S. visas.

Contact ACI-NA’s Diane Peterson or A.J. Muldoon for more information.

Learn more about ACI-NA Committees and Programs

Industry News

JFK Collision Raises Concerns about Safety with Big Aircraft
Aviation Week & Space Technology, April 18, By Andrew Compart
The April 11 mishap at a taxiway intersection at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport involving an Airbus A380 is raising some big questions. Dick Marchi, a senior adviser for ACI-NA, suggests controllers, who devote more attention to runway clearance, might be given more responsibility for taxiways. (Subscription may be required).

Washington Asleep On the Job for Aviation
Aviation Week & Space Technology, April 18, Editorial
U.S. Congress is slashing government spending to reduce the crushing $14 trillion national debt and pare down this fiscal year’s deficit of $1.4 trillion, as estimated by the Congressional Budget Office. The mood on Capitol Hill is taking its toll at the TSA and FAA. Unfortunately, these cuts—the latest are in the 11th-hour agreement reached to stave off a looming government shutdown—will translate into further setbacks for airports, airlines, the air cargo industry and travelers. (Subscription may be required).

TSA Security Looks at People Who Complain About ... TSA Security
CNN, April 15, By Mike M. Ahlers and Jeanne Meserve
Arrogant complaining about airport security is one indicator Transportation Security Administration officers consider when looking for possible criminals and terrorists, CNN has learned exclusively. And, when combined with other behavioral indicators, it could result in a traveler facing additional scrutiny.

Air Canada Head Bullish on Low-Cost Airline
The Globe and Mail, April 15, By Brent Jang
Air Canada’s new low-cost airline division will be launched next winter, targeting under-served destinations in Europe, Mexico and the Caribbean with non-stop service, the chief executive officer said in an interview. He is undeterred by a setback suffered Friday, when the pilots’ union cancelled its ratification vote for a tentative labor agreement.

aci-na.org

Blog: U.S. Gets It Wrong on Infrastructure
ACI-NA President Greg Principato
guest blogging this week in the National Journal noted that unlike most other countries the U.S. gets it wrong by putting politics first and infrastructure investments last. Greg also posted a blog in The Hill, a Capitol Hill publication, observing that President Obama can’t have it both ways – promoting infrastructure investments while cutting the funding.

New Research Posted
Common Airport Pavement Maintenance Practices:  This Airport Cooperative Research Program synthesis explores how airports implement a pavement maintenance management program, including inspecting and tracking pavement condition, scheduling maintenance, identifying necessary funds, and treating distresses in asphalt and concrete pavements.

Mitigating Deicer Induced Distress Potential: A Revision of an Interim Procedure: The American Concrete Pavement Association has released a research and technology update that explores the mechanism that results in early pavement distress and the potential role of deicers in that distress.

Training

Advance your career and improve your skills by enrolling in one of ACI’s online Certificate Programs.

Certificate in Airport Environmental Management
This certificate program provides airport staff with an understanding of the basic principles of sustainable development and environmental management at an airport.

Cost     $695. For more information,
www.olc.aero or enrolments@olc.aero

Certificate in Concession Management
This certificate program provides staff with the knowledge and skills to be more proficient in the management of airport concessions.

Cost     $395 For more information, www.olc.aero or enrolments@olc.aero

Certificate in Project Management
This certificate program is designed for individuals, project team members and managers who are new to project management as a formal discipline.  The course is developed in line with the Project Management Body of Knowledge adopted by the Project Management Institute and by organizations throughout the world.

Cost     $950. For more information, www.olc.aero or enrolments@olc.aero

 

These safety awareness courses are a must for all personnel that work on the airside and highly recommended for all airport workers.

Human Factors Awareness Training (English and French)
This course provides participants with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of human factors and will help them to recognize, understand and deal with human performance issues at an airport.

Cost     $50. For more information,
www.olc.aero or enrolments@olc.aero

Safety Management Systems Awareness Training
This course introduces participants to the key principles and concepts of Safety Management Systems.  Most Civil Aviation Authorities around the world now require all personnel working at an airport to undertake initial and recurrent SMS Awareness Training.

Cost     $50. For more information, www.olc.aero or enrolments@olc.aero
 

Info Desk

The Bureau of Transportation Statistics reported last week that U.S. airlines carried 53.7 million scheduled domestic and international passengers in January 2011. This is a 2.2 percent increase from January 2010. The January 2011 passenger total was 3.7 percent above that of two years ago in January 2009 but still remained 6.9 percent below the early recession level of 57.7 million in January 2008.

BTS also reported in a release of preliminary data that U.S. airlines carried 1.8 percent more domestic passengers in January 2011 than in January 2010. The number of international passengers on U.S. carriers in January 2011 increased 4.8 percent over January 2010. The January 2011 load factors of 76.5 percent system-wide and 76.6 percent domestic were the highest recorded for any January.

Hot Topics Full Text

ACI-NA today commended Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood for issuing new regulations that better protect air travelers.  Airports have long advocated that airlines be required to provide passengers with more and better information on which to base travel decisions.  ACI-NA had also urged DOT to issue regulations protecting passengers on international flights and those traveling through smaller airports.

“These changes are most welcome,” said ACI-NA President Greg Principato. “All passengers deserve the same legal rights during extended tarmac delays, not just those flying exclusively within the United States or those traveling through medium or large hubs.”

ACI-NA is pleased that DOT recognized the important role that small airports play in the U.S. air transportation system by requiring that both U.S. and foreign airlines include small hubs and non-hubs in their tarmac delay contingency plans and ensure that the plan has been coordinated with airport authorities at those airports.

Additionally, ACI-NA applauded DOT for requiring that the obligation to adopt a tarmac delay plan and comply with its terms is not only the responsibility of the code-sharing airline operating the flight, but also the airline under which the service is marketed.

“Airports are the public face of aviation in hundreds of communities throughout the United States,” said Principato. “Every day airport officials are working hard to provide the highest level of safety and customer service for air travelers. These new rules will further enhance coordination between airports, airlines and government agencies and provide a better travel experience for passengers.”

Today, the Department of Homeland Security announced its replacement of the color-coded threat advisory system with the National Terrorism Advisory System, a robust terrorism advisory system that provides timely information to the public about credible terrorist threats.

ACI-NA commends the department for the development of the new system. ACI-NA is encouraged that alerts issued under the new system will more effectively communicate information about terrorist threats and identify specific actions to be taken in response to those threats.

Under NTAS, DHS will coordinate with other federal entities to issue detailed alerts to the public when the federal government receives information about a credible terrorist threat. The alerts will provide a concise summary of the potential threat including geographic region, mode of transportation, or critical infrastructure potentially affected by the threat, actions being taken to ensure public safety, as well as recommended steps that individuals, communities, business and governments can take to help prevent, mitigate or respond to a threat.

NTAS Alerts will include a clear statement on the nature of the threat, which will be defined in one of two ways:

  • “Elevated Threat”: Warns of a credible terrorist threat against the United States
  • “Imminent Threat”: Warns of a credible, specific, and impending terrorist threat against the United States

“ACI-NA is pleased to have coordinated with DHS and TSA during the transition to NTAS,” said ACI-NA President Greg Principato.  “We are optimistic that the alerts issued under the new advisory system will provide better information to airports and passengers in more clearly defining the threat, and identifying appropriate action.”

Airports also welcomed the “sunset provision” in the new system, specifying a specific time period for the alert, which allows it to be cancelled or extended if new information becomes available.

“We welcome DHS’s efforts to employ a more risk-based, intelligence-driven approach to security measures. ACI-NA has long advocated for a risk-based approach as it helps to more precisely focus limited resources to address threats. U.S. airports will continue to coordinate with DHS to develop an efficient and effective security system,” said Principato.

NTAS was first announced on Jan. 27, during Secretary Janet Napolitano’s “State of America’s Homeland Security” address. After which, began a 90-day transition period with state and local governments, law enforcement, private and non-profit sector partners, airports, and other transportation hubs.

As a result of a request by Las Vegas McCarran International Airport to create an air service development incentive program designed to encourage airlines to use larger planes, the FAA on Friday decided to seek comments on the concept before acting on the airport’s petition.

ACI-NA will file comments supporting the airport’s proposal by seeking a broad interpretation of the FAA Air Carrier Incentive Program Guidebook. Comments are due by May 31.

In its petition, McCarran is seeking to use a weight-based air service incentive program, which would allow the airport to reward air carriers for an increase in landed weight, an increase in the size of aircraft use, “upgauging” on existing flights, or by adding flights on an existing route served by a carrier.

Since the airport participates in the Airport Improvement Program, its incentive programs are subject to review by the FAA.

The Guidebook, issued last fall by the agency’s Office of Airport Compliance, defines new air service as either service to a new destination, an upgrade to non-stop service, a new carrier to the market or an increase in the number of flights to a current destination.  To date, the FAA’s interpretation of new service has not permitted the type of incentive program that Las Vegas is seeking.

Contact ACI-NA’s Monica Hargrove for more information.

This week, ACI-NA’s President Greg Principato sent letters to the leadership of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee outlining airport priorities as the two chambers begin their work ironing out the differences in their two versions of the FAA reauthorization bill. 

ACI-NA’s letter focuses on the importance of providing adequate funding for airport infrastructure and stresses that the only way airports will be able to meet these needs is through an increase in the Passenger Facility Charge coupled with a robust AIP program.   The letter asks the House and Senate to lift the cap on the PFC in the final bill and include the Senate’s funding number of $4 billion for the Airport Improvement Program instead of the House’s $3 billion.

Principato’s letter stresses that the resolution of the funding issue will be critical to ACI-NA’s decision on whether or not to support the final bill.  Principato states in the letter that “If the final agreement does not contain an increase in the PFC and AIP remains at the House-passed funding level, ACI-NA will have no choice but to oppose the conference report.  Without sufficient funding in the bill, airports will be unable to make critical safety and security improvements.  If Congress chooses not to provide adequate airport infrastructure funding, it is uncertain whether state and local governments will be able to absorb the cost of unfunded federal mandates and ensure the safety and security of the traveling public.”

ACI-NA also asked the Senate to accept the House language which would protect data collected through the FAA’s proposed safety management systems and provide liability protection for airports under the SMS program.  ACI-NA led the coalition of aviation groups that worked with the House to get these much needed provisions placed in the bill.

In addition ACI-NA reached out to other organizations with interests in the FAA bill and brought together a coalition which sent a letter expressing their support for lifting the cap on the PFC, supporting the Senate’s $4 billion in AIP funding, and ensuring the continuation of the Small Community Airports Development Program and the Essential Air Service program.   The coalition letter was signed by AAAE, the Airport Consultants Council, American Council of Engineering Companies, National Association of Counties, National Association of State Aviation Officials, National League of Cities and the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Principato said it is important that all ACI-NA members send a letter, call, visit with, or email their representatives and senators and urge them to push ACI-NA’s priorities with the Senate and House committee leaders in order to get them included in the final FAA bill the Congress sends to the president.

Contact ACI-NA’s Jane Calderwood for more information.

ACI-NA successfully delayed action on a proposed House-credentialing bill that would have forced airports to allow individuals who are denied a SIDA badge to use the Transportation Worker Identification Credential waiver and appeals process through TSA.

It would have also allowed TSA to incorporate the costs of the TWIC waiver and appeals process through the security threat assessment fee.  Additionally, this draft legislation would have mandated a rulemaking by TSA to “consolidate and harmonize the security threat assessment process for transportation workers,” which gives TSA broad authority to work through a rulemaking currently underway to streamline the background check process across all DHS agencies.  This broad authority could set up a SIDA and TWIC merger.

Although other aviation-related organizations had signed off on the bill, ACI-NA staff pressed for changes and was asked to meet with the chief of staff for Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Ala., chairman of the Homeland Security Transportation Security Subcommittee, and other senior subcommittee staff members to discuss the airports concerns with the proposed language.  The meeting was very productive and as a result, the Rogers’ staff agreed to delay action on the bill and work with ACI-NA to address the concerns aired in the meeting.

Contact ACI-NA’s Jane Calderwood for more information.

The Strategic Planning and Performance Management Working Group of the ACI-NA Finance Committee held the first of a series of Best Practices Forum webinars on “Strategic Planning” on April 12. It was well attended with 28 airport and associate members.

The mission for the “Best Practices Forum”, according to David Boenitz, business planning director of the San Diego County Regional Airport Authority, is to “offer a prime opportunity to create a discussion venue to identify and characterize common airport practices and ultimately, develop a best practices knowledge database.” The forum’s success will ultimately depend on “relevant content, practical application and participant commitment.”

The first webinar featured a brief overview of ACRP’s Strategic Planning in the Airport Industry provided by Pete Ricondo of Ricondo & Associates. The report provides practical guidance on the strategic planning process for airport board members, directors, department leaders, and other employees; aviation industry associations; a variety of airport stakeholders, consultants, and other airport planning professionals; and aviation regulatory agencies. A workbook of tools and sequential steps of the strategic planning process is provided along with the report.

The group decided to hold its second webinar in June on “strategic planning” highlighting a few airport examples such as Dallas/Fort Worth, San Diego and Toronto regarding their strategic planning development process and current status.

Contact ACI-NA’s Liying Gu for more information.

Next Friday, April 29, there may be a new set of rules governing travel into and between European Union members. Some, but not all, of the EU members have adopted a regulation suggested by the European Commission which relaxes some of the rules concerning carry-on liquids, aerosol and gels.

In a bulletin issued this week, ACI notes that a confusing situation within Europe is emerging, especially for airport retailers. Here is the situation at the moment:

ACI said it is concerned that the situation in the EU could remain very confusing for a period of time. There is a risk, therefore, that if non-EU airports, retailers or airlines advertise this change and encourage passengers transferring through airports in Europe to purchase liquids, aerosol and gels, then these items could still be confiscated from passengers at the EU transfer airport.  Clearly, this would lead to increased passenger dissatisfaction and frustration, as well as create problems for the EU airports, which would have to handle the disgruntled passengers. 

Until further notice, ACI recommends that airports and retailers outside the EU:

Passengers traveling on flights to the EU from U.S. and Canada are covered under bilateral agreements permitting them to carry liquids, aerosol and gels through transfer screening points at EU airports.

 
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